Reminder: Upcoming Dec. 15 Deadline for Several TCA Awards

Saturday, December 15th is a big day for those wishing to apply or be nominated for several annual awards from the Tennessee Cattlemen’s Association, including both adult and youth awards. For a list of the applications due on the 15th, see below.

TCA (adult) Award Nomination Forms– Know someone that has excelled in the field of cattle production, education or youth development? We hope you will consider nominating them for one of our Tennessee Cattlemen’s Association’s annual awards. We recognize FFA, 4-H and adult agriculture work as well as a Distinguished Service award. Awards are presented during the luncheon at TCA Convention on Friday, January 25th. Click here for the nomination forms.

  • Outstanding Work in FFA Beef Program
  • Outstanding Work in 4-H Beef Program
  • Jim Neel Outstanding Work in Beef Cattle Adult Area
  • John Bartee Distinguished Service Award
  • Emmitt Rawls Outstanding Stocker Producer
  • Clyde Lane Outstanding Cow-calf Producer
  • Business Person of the Year
  • TCA Outstanding Youth Award

TCA (youth) Award Applications—There are several new opportunities for TCA youth members to take advantage of. See below for award nomination forms, scholarship applications, and applications for leadership within the TCYA.

  • Farm Credit Mid America/TCA Youth Beef Heifer Initiative Scholarship
  • TCA Outstanding Youth Award
  • Tennessee Cattlemen’s Youth Association Ambassador

Please feel free to reach out to our office with any questions or concerns that you may have. Don’t forget to submit your paperwork by December 15th!

Meet the Future Monday: Ben Hansen of Robertson County, Tennessee

Hansen Insta MFMAs a new-comer to farming, Ben Hansen as learned everything about this way of life from scratch and gained a simple, yet sound appreciation for farming and raising cattle. Read our Q&A with Ben Hansen on Robertson County, Tennessee to learn more about this week’s Meet the Future Monday and the plans that he has for the future of his operation.

Describe your operation.

We only have 26 acres so when we decided to breed cows my parents thought it was best to go with quality rather than quantity. We purchased 8 recip cows then bought embryos that’s how we started our herd.

What have you enjoyed most about being on a farm?

I love the space and being able to ride around on my four-wheeler motorbike.

Who has been your biggest role model in pursing your farming aspirations?

My parents; we were new to farming a few years back and they taught me that hard work pays off and to have an open mind when learning new things.

What are you most passionate about in your business?Hansen 1

I think it’s very important to work with your cattle while they are young. It is so much easier to do what you have to do with them if they are used to being around you. We can easily get our cows up by calling them with a bucket of feed.

What are some of your greatest challenges that you face as a young farmer?

It can be very difficult to stay involved in the farm during football season or when things at school get busy. Also, kids that are not involved in farming often don’t understand what you must do and they think it’s stupid.

Where do you see yourself and your operation in 10 years?

I really want to go to college and study engineering. I want to stay involved in the farm and hopefully during my studies I can find ways to help improve our breeding program. One day when I have a family I hope that my kids get to experience working with cattle and how it teaches you responsibility and hard work

How will you continue to improve and grow your operation?Hansen3

They are a lot of clinics out there to help young farmers and I think it’s important to go to them. Things are always changing and technology is becoming a big part of farming I think my generation can use this as an advantage to change how things are done.

How do you intend to leave your footprint on the beef industry in Tennessee?

I would like our farm to have a reputation for providing quality breeding cattle. By learning how to read EPDs and understanding how to combine genetics we can breed quality cattle in Tennessee.

What could the existing farmers do most to help future farmers such as yourself?Hansen4

I think today’s farmers are doing a great job helping kids like me become involved in farming, by teaching us work ethics and setting examples for how to run a successful business.  The incentives out there for scholarships are great as well. I think work experience on farms would be a great way to help us learn more on how different farms operate.

What is your favourite beef dish?

I love steak!!

 

Tennessee Cattlemen’s Association To Continue Show Point Program in 2019

(MURFREESBORO—NOVEMBER 20, 2018) The Tennessee Cattlemen’s Association (TCA) will continue the widely successful show point incentive program, Tennessee’s Top Tier, that they started at the beginning of this year, again in 2019. The program will run similar to 2018 with only a few minor changes.TCA Show Cattle Pt2

The show point program is in place to encourage youth involvement at cattle shows and other agricultural events, and create additional recognition and rewards exclusively for members of the Tennessee Cattlemen’s Youth Association (TCYA) whom participate.

The 2019 circuit will begin with the Rocky Top Classic show in Knoxville, Tennessee on December 1 and run through the Tennessee State Fair. The circuit will consist of nine shows. Year-end awards for the 2019 circuit will be awarded at the 2020 TCA Convention and Trade Show.

Youth that are eligible to participate must be under 21 years of age and a TCA youth member. Memberships are $10 annually.

Those interested in participating or learning more are encouraged to visit the website, www.tncattle.org/tennessee-s-top-tier, for more information such as point vales, awards, and rules/guidelines. Please direct any questions to melinda@tncattle.org.

TCYA logo

Tennessee Cattlemen’s to Hold 34th Annual Convention & Trade Show

1The Tennessee Cattlemen’s Association (TCA) will celebrate 34 years of serving the state’s cattle producers with its annual convention and trade show in Murfreesboro, Tenn. on January 25-26. Attendees will hear from top livestock industry speakers addressing topics like herd health, forage systems, sustainability, and the current state of the beef business.

Informational breakout sessions called, “Cow Colleges” will be held on both Friday and Saturday. The speakers at these sessions include: Kendall Frazier, executive director of the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association (NCBA); Dr. Darrh Bullock, the Extension Beef Cattle Specialist for the University of Kentucky; Dr. Scott Brown of the University of Missouri will discuss the cattle market outlook; Dr. Mark Alley from Zoetis will share tips on transitioning to stocker cattle; Specialists from the University of Tennessee Extension will present on current research; and finally, representatives from the USDA and FSA will offer insights on Pasture, Rangeland, and Forage programs.

“At this year’s convention, I had over the reins to a new president,” said Steve Anderson, TCA’s president and cattle producer from Smith County. “I am proud to offer these great speakers to our attendees as my last leadership activity. No one will leave our event without a vast array of new ideas and new friends.”

In conjunction with TCA events, the Tennessee Dairy Producers Association (TDPA) will also meet. TDPA will hold its own meetings but will come together for general sessions. Additionally, UT Agriculture Extension Veterinarian Dr. Lew Strickland is once again arranging for a Veterinarian Continuing Education Seminar to be held in conjunction with the meeting.

Beginning at 9 a.m. on Friday, attendees can visit the trade to talk with more than 100 exhibitors. Vendors will be showing off new products, services, and the latest technology for the beef and dairy industries. Also that morning, there will be a live bull and heifer sale in the trade show area held by the University of Tennessee.

Later that day, TCA will be presenting several scholarships to youth and honoring outstanding industry leaders and members during the awards luncheon.

On Saturday, there will be a special opportunity for the youth participate in activities including a quiz bowl, scavenger hunt, and a Youth for the Quality Care of Animals Training Session. The Tennessee CattleWomen will also meet on Saturday morning where they will hear a presentation from Sharon Beals, the Vice President of Food & Safety for CTI Foods. All convention-goers are welcome to attend this meeting.

Pre-registration is $20 for Friday or $15 for Saturday. It is $30 for both Friday and Saturday. Lunch cost is extra. Pre-registration ends Jan. 18. Late registration and registration at the door will be an additional $10 over pre-registration fees.

Attendees can register online at www.tncattle.org. A full schedule of events can also be found on the TCA website. If attendees would like to register for the TDPA sessions, they need to register with Stan Butt. If they are attending the Veterinarian sessions, they’ll register with Dr. Strickland. For hotel reservations, call the Embassy Suites Hotel at (615) 890-4464 or online: www.murfreesboro.embassysuites.com.

Meet the Future Monday: Morgan Riley of Williamson County, Tennessee

MRiley InstaAs a talented showman, honors student, and athlete, Morgan Riley of Williamson County, Tennessee is a well-rounded member of her community and the cattle industry in Tennessee. Raising competitive show cattle has taught Morgan the value of hard work and responsibility, and she continues to be rewarded for her hard work in and out of the show ring. Read our Q&A with Morgan below to learn more. Also, be sure to check out her family’s sale offering this weekend at Banner Elite Genetics.

Describe your operation.

I’m a part of Banner Elite Genetics and a fourth-generation cattle breeder in middle Tennessee with locations in College Grove, Eagleville, and Chapel Hill. We have a 150-head cow/calf operation of Angus and Hereford cattle. Our emphasis is mainly on performance cattle, but a select few of the herd are geared towards the show ring because of my passion for showing them. We also have an annual production sale the Saturday after Thanksgiving where we feature our latest genetics.

What have you enjoyed most about growing up on the farm?

I have really enjoyed watching my favorite show heifers produce quality calves that I can then show as bred and owned. Watching them grow and develop is exciting as I can see all my hard work pay off. I also enjoy the responsibility that comes with raising and showing cattle. It has been great and rewarding to meet new people across the state and country as well.

Who has been your biggest role model in pursuing your farming aspirations?

My uncle, Michael Banner, has played a huge part in introducing me to the cattle industry. He was the one that introduced me to showing cattle and helps me on show days.  He continues to give me advice on how I can continue to grow and improve the operation.M. Riley1

What are you most passionate about in your business?

It would be continuing to learn more about the beef industry as I get older. I hope to continue to strive to always improve the quality of my operation for both phenotype and genotype.

What are some of the greatest challenges that you face as a young farmer?

Time management has been a major challenge for me as I have an aggressive school schedule with honors and AP classes. I am also on the high school softball team and a travel team as well as managing the daily responsibilities of my cows and a busy cow show schedule.

Where do you see yourself and your operation in 10 years?

My goal would be that I’m in vet school working towards becoming a large animal vet specializing in animal reproduction. I also hope to have a core group of great cows to continue my love for the beef industry.M. Riley4

How will you continue to improve and grow your operation?

By purchasing one or two of the best animals I can each year while also trying to keep some of the ones that I raise.  Then, choosing the right bulls to breed them to so I can raise better calves year over year to improve the quality of my operation.

How do you intend to leave your footprint on the beef industry in Tennessee?

By selling my cattle to local, regional, and national breeders to improve the beef industry, so I can leave my mark.  Hopefully the cattle that have been successful for me can be even more successful for others.

What could the existing farmers do most to help future farmers such as yourself?

Passing on their knowledge and share their successes and challenges so our generation of young farmers can continue to strive to improve the beef industry through their valuable years of experience.M. Riley2

 What is your favorite beef dish?

Brisket!

Valuable Rancher Recordkeeping Tool from NCBA Available for 2019

abstract brown background leather color, vintage grunge backgrouA pocket-sized recordkeeping tool from the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association offered to cattle producers for more than 30 years, is now available for 2019. NCBA’s Redbook helps cattle producers effectively and efficiently record their daily production efforts, helping enhance profitability.
The 2019 Redbook has more than 100 pages to record calving activity, herd health, pasture use, cattle inventory, body condition, cattle treatment, AI breeding records and more. It also contains a Producers Guide for Judicious Use of Antimicrobials in Cattle, Beef Quality Assurance Best Practices, and proper injection technique information, as well as a calendar and notes section.
“The Redbook has become a vital tool for U.S. cattlemen and women in their efforts to detail actions and practices on farms and ranches,” according to Dan Kniffen, a Pennsylvania beef producer. “It’s a way to document both the daily challenges and the positive steps they’re taking to show continuous improvement on their operations. Furthermore, in this age of electronics, the paper Redbook is cost-effective and always available, regardless of internet service or access to electricity. It’s a time-proven handheld method for record-keeping.”
Redbooks can be purchased for $7.00 each, plus shipping and handling. Customization of the Redbooks is available (for 100 books or more). To order, visit www.beefusa.org, click on “Producers.”
For more information on the NCBA Redbooks, contact Grace Webb at gwebb@beef.org,
(800) 525-3085.

FIVE on Friday: FIVE(+) Tennessee Cattlemen’s Association Annual Awards

FiveOnFridayKnow someone that has excelled in the field of cattle production, education or youth development? We hope you will consider nominating them for one of our Tennessee Cattlemen’s Association’s annual awards. We recognize FFA, 4-H and adult agriculture work as well as a Distinguished Service award. Awards are presented during the luncheon on Friday, Jan. 25th or during the AllTech Youth Awards Banquet on Friday evening. Read below to learn more about these awards and how to apply. Award applications and nomination forms can be found here.

  1. Outstanding Work in FFA Beef Program. To be eligible for this award, the vocational agriculture teacher shall have worked three or more years with the agricultural department at the time of the Annual Convention of the Tennessee Cattlemen’s Association at which the award is made. The award shall be based on educational programs and activities related to the FFA beef cattle project39655481934_5d37a806c8_o
  2. Outstanding Work in 4-H Beef Program. To be eligible for this award, the Extension Agent shall have worked three or more years with the UT Extension Service at the time of the Annual Convention of the Tennessee Cattlemen’s Association at which the award is made. The award shall be based on educational programs and activities related to the 4-H beef cattle project conducted in the current and previous two calendar years.
  3. Jim Neel Outstanding Work in Beef Cattle Adult Area. To be eligible for this award, the Extension agent shall have worked five or more years with the Agricultural Extension Service at the time of the Annual Convention of the Tennessee Cattlemen’s Association at which the award is made. The award shall be based on educational programs related to beef cattle conducted in the current and previous four calendar years.
  4. John Bartee Distinguished Service Award. The Distinguished Service Award will be presented to an individual who has made exceptional contributions and has demonstrated leadership abilities which have greatly benefited Tennessee’s beef cattle industry and has supported activities of the Tennessee Cattlemen’s Association. Each nominee may be from either business, government, education or a beef cattle producer. 40366399481_33bea377be_o
  5. Dr. Emmitt Rawls Outstanding Stocker Producer. The “Outstanding Stocker Producer Award” will be presented by the Tennessee Cattlemen’s Association to recognize an individual that has excelled in the areas of stocker cattle production and marketing. Each nominee can either be an individual producer or a partner. The award will be to the individual, not a firm.
  6. Dr. Clyde Lane Outstanding Cow-Calf Producer. The “Outstanding Cow-Calf Producer Award” will be presented by the Tennessee Cattlemen’s Association to recognize an individual that has excelled in the areas of beef cattle production and marketing. Each nominee can either be an individual producer or a partner. The award will be to the individual, not a firm.
  7. Business Person of the Year. The “Businessperson of the Year Award” will be presented to a representative of a firm to: (1) recognize the individual’s and/or the firm’s exceptional accomplishments and contributions that have greatly benefitted Tennessee’s beef cattle industry, (2) recognize support of the activities of the Tennessee Cattlemen’s Association by that individual/firm.26495056098_d8fcd7332e_o
  8. TCA Outstanding Youth Award. Two awards will be presented to outstanding youth members of the Tennessee Cattlemen’s Youth Association for their outstanding leadership in cattle related activities. These awards will be based off nominations from Tennessee Cattlemen’s Association members, county Association leadership, county Extension Agents, and Agriculture Educators/FFA Advisors.

APPLY TODAY! Award applications/nomination forms are due December 15!

40366400991_ff67368598_o

Meet the Future Monday: Lexi Stout of Cumberland County, Tennessee

LexiMFMInstaThe center of this week’s Meet the Future Monday is Lexi Stout of Cumberland County, Tennessee. Lexi is an active 4-H and FFA member and avid showman with a clear and simple plan for the future. Read this week’s Meet the Future Monday Q&A to learn more about Lexi.

Describe your operation.

I live on a farm that consists of 30 acres, on which I have commercial and registered cattle.

What have you enjoyed most about growing up on the farm?

What I’ve enjoyed the most about growing up on a farm is that it teaches responsibility and to care about others, not just yourself. You must be responsible when caring for your animals before yourself.

Who has been your biggest role model in pursuing your farming aspirations? 

My dad has been my biggest role model. Not just because he is my dad but because he has taught me many life lessons when working cattle together and driving in the field checking cattle. Stout2

What are you most passionate about in your business?

Talking to people is my biggest and most important passion in my business. The reason why is because people that haven’t grown up on a farm have many questions about farming, and want to know about my operation.

What are some of the greatest challenges that you face as a young farmer?

The greatest challenge that I face is that I’m the oldest so I have to do almost everything by self because my brother and sister are not old enough to help yet.

Where do you see yourself and your operation in 10 years?Stout3

I see myself having a degree in agriculture and getting a job in the industry. I see my operation growing to where I can raise and sell registered show cattle to the younger generation to help them start their own herd.

How will you continue to improve and grow your operation? 

I will continue to grow my operation by improving the genetics in my herd. I will take those genetics that I am going to improve and build upon them.

How do you intend to leave your footprint on the beef industry in Tennessee? 

I want to leave to my footprint in the beef industry by spreading my genetics with other people in the beef industry to help better their genetics.

What could the existing farmers do most to help farmers such as yourself? 
The existing farmers could help educate the younger generation. Also, invest their time into the younger generation and help them with their herd.Stout1

What is your favorite beef dish? 

Ribeye steak

 

Meet the Future Monday: Evan Jackson of Benton County, Tennessee

EJackson MFM Insta

Not only was Evan Jackson born into the agriculture industry as a seventh-generation farmer but for his second birthday he received six females that laid the foundation for his very own cattle herd. It is safe to say that farming and raising cattle runs deep in Evan’s blood. Read this week’s Meet the Future Monday to learn more about Evan Jackson the 11-year-old cattle enthusiast and Tennessee Cattlemen’s Youth Association member from Benton County, Tennessee.

Describe your operation:

I currently live on my family farm consisting of roughly 1500 acres where we grow wheat, corn, soybeans, Bermuda grass hay, pumpkins and beef cattle.  My younger sister and I are the seventh generation to live and work on our century farm.  I received six black Angus cows for my second birthday (which is all I asked for!) and have grown my herd slowly from within.  We have the small herd of 31 registered black Angus cattle and calves, show cattle (two Herefords, two Simmental/Angus), horses, a pony, a donkey, sheep, pygmy goats, geese, ducks, chickens, dogs, and cats. EJackson6

What have you enjoyed most about growing up on the farm?

The animals.  I love animals and love being around them.  I spend many hours at the barn when we are home cleaning out stalls, feeding and taking care of the animals, and working on fences.  I love being out away from all the noise where it is quiet, you can only see fields from the house, and riding the ranger or 4-wheeler on the farm to go check the cattle and fences.  I love being with my family on the land and being able to hunt and fish whenever I want.

Who has been your biggest role model in pursuing your farming aspirations?

I would have to say my mom has been my biggest role model.  She, along with her brother, showed horses, sheep and hogs in 4-H when they were growing up and tell me many stories about it all.  She also had all kinds of animals on her farm and helped her dad with them as well as the row cropping and hay operation.  She still works on the farm today as well as a full time job in education. The rest of my family are also role models to me in the amount of work and time sacrifice they all do for each other.  MyEJackson7 dad works hard to help get all the equipment we need and to take me to all these cattle shows.  My uncle is a veterinarian and we call on him all the time for our animal needs and he’s always right there to doctor them and give us advice.  My sister and grandparents always help out and support me in every way.  We all can’t imagine any other life than farming.

What are you most passionate about in your business?

Definitely my cattle.  I just love beef cattle the best.  I also am very interested in several kinds of cattle and I plan to raise more than one breed.  I mean, cows are my life.

What are some of the greatest challenges that you face as a young farmer?

Being a farmer is just challenging in general, but it seems to get more expensive to put in crops, fertilize them, and buy feed all the time.  It’s getting harder to make it on the farm without another job off the farm as well.  Technology is increasing, which is great, but also drives up the prices of equipment.  This makes it even harder for the small farm and rancher like us to keep the farm profitable.EJackson5

There is also the huge time factor to get everything done.  My family and I are always talking about how there is literally not enough time in the day to get all the things accomplished that we need to.  I play all kinds of sports, have church youth activities and must do my homework to keep good grades.  Needless to say, we truly don’t sleep a lot around our place.  But thankfully, I am a morning person so I just get up anyway!

Where do you see yourself and your operation in 10 years?

In ten years, I will be a junior in college.  I hope to be very close to completing a degree in agriculture and coming back after graduation to run my family farm.  I want to improve and expand the cattle operation all that I can with quality genetics and calves to sell and be able to make the land as useful and profitable as possible.

How will you continue to improve and grow your operation?

I want to continue to add more heifers to our herd and increase in numbers.  We have recently cleared and fenced in more pasture land for the cattle and will need to do more.  I always want to make improvements to our working system barn and I would like to add automatic waters.EJackson4

How do you intend to leave your footprint on the beef industry in Tennessee?

Well I certainly want to be known for good, quality beef cattle of various breeds.  I also want to be able to help others when I grow up.  I have had some very good support, help, and advice from good friends and family in this industry that I respect and appreciate.  I want to be able to help someone else get into this business or show cattle, or even just learn about farming.  I hope someday Eagle Creek Cattle will have a very strong name and reputation.

What could the existing farmers do most to help future farmers such as yourself?

They could make sure that they pass on all their farm knowledge and all they have learned through their experiences in the years.  My grandfather may not be able to physically work like he once did on the farm, but he certainly gives me good instructions on how to do many things, like how to drive different tractors and how to fix the hay baler when it messes up!  I always need advice from the current and older farmers.  Their expertise is invaluable to the younger generation.EJackson1

What is your favorite beef dish?

It would have to be the awesome grilled hamburgers that my grandad and grandma grill from our own processed beef.

FIVE on Friday: FIVE Things to Know About Tennessee Agriculture Literacy Week

FiveOnFridayAs we flip the calendars to November, there’s one industry event we want to be sure you get marked on your calendar for this month and that is Tennessee Agriculture Literacy Week, November 11-17. A week dedicated to farmers and agriculturists reading accurate agriculture books to school children across the state of Tennessee. As a farmer or agriculturist, yourself, here are FIVE things you should know as you prepare for Tennessee Agriculture Literacy Week…

  1. Make contact early. To assure that you are granted permission by the school system and teacher for the appropriate amount of time and in the desired grade level, make sure you contact the school as soon as possible. Communicate with them the purpose of Tennessee Agriculture Literacy Week and your desire to share accurate, age appropriate, agriculture information with the students. AndersonReading
  2. Books are available in your county. Don’t let the excuse of not having an agriculture book hold you back. Accurate agriculture books can be secured at your county Farm Bureau office, local Extension Office, and library.
  3. Do more than just read! If you desire, there are other agriculture activities than just reading to the students. These activities pair great with the agriculture books or work as their own activity too. View the full list of readings and activities, here.
  4. Incentives. There are incentives for READERS and TEACHERS. As a reader, be sure to fill out the reader feedback form (and send in pictures too) to be entered to win an insulated mug. Also, encourage the teachers of the classrooms you visit to fill out their feedback form to be entered to win a Walmart gift card for their classroom. Forms are available here. Reading
  5. Share your story. Start by introducing yourself and your role in the agriculture industry. Read the book, show the students pictures, complete the activity, and share your knowledge about agriculture. Above all, remind the students (and teachers) how Tennessee farmers care for and protect their animals and the environment.

We hope you will make plans to participate in Tennessee Agriculture Literacy Week November 11-17. Not only is this a great way for farmers, producers, and agriculturists to get involved, but it is a great way for 4-H and FFA members to get involved too. For more information visit, tennesseeag.org.